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Coalition aims to cut traffic fatalities

Many Kentucky drivers may be worried about the dangers of accidents when they get behind the wheel every day. One new coalition is bringing together safety experts, government agencies and private industry to work to eliminate fatalities caused by traffic accidents. The Road to Zero Coalition argues that traffic deaths are universally preventable. However, over 100 people each day are killed in crashes on American roadways. The coalition says that its goal is to achieve zero traffic fatalities before 2050.

There are 650 members of the coalition, which aims to support roadway safety initiatives to cut the number and severity of car accidents. The founding of the coalition was inspired by the rise in fatalities on the roadways. In 2016, 37,461 people were killed in car crashes, which represented an increase of 5.6 percent over the previous year. The coalition includes trucking companies and suppliers as well, which is particularly important since truck accidents and related fatalities have also been on the rise. In 2016, 4,317 people lost their lives in large truck accidents with 722 truck drivers or passengers numbering among the victims.

The coalition recommends a number of actions in order to improve safety on the roads. For example, they are urging an increase in seat belt usage. While seat belt usage sits at a high 90 percent, 100 percent coverage could save even more lives. A full 50 percent of the people killed in car accidents are among the 10 percent of those not using seat belts. In addition, the coalition also encourages the development of technologies to improve safety. Technologies like collision warnings can be further improved to save lives.

Car accidents can cost lives and also cause severe, long-lasting injuries. People who have been hurt in car crashes due to another person's negligent or dangerous driving can work with a personal injury attorney. A lawyer can help accident victims pursue compensation for the harms they have suffered.

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